Tag Archives: change of career

Training to Be a Cognitive Behavioural Hypnotherapist – My experience

13 Aug

I have just completed my Advanced Diploma exam at CCBT. The journey to this point has taken just over a year to complete taking the fast track route Foundation, Diploma before the Advanced Diploma courses. In this time I have learned huge amounts about myself, my fellow students and people in general. I am now a practicing CBH therapist and believe the courses have equipped me for this demanding and rewarding role. All the staff at CCBT willingly share their wealth of experience (without breaking confidentiality of course), are skilled trainers and are all thoroughly good people. The course materials are packed with pragmatic, useful, and concise information and the course assessments are challenging and thoughtfully designed to embed the underlying principles, core structure and key concepts of CBT / REBT.

Becoming a therapist wasn’t the main motivation for me when signing up for the Foundation course. Initially, the main reasons were personal (I wanted to learn more about self hypnosis and to understand more about depression and anxiety as I have friends and family members with these conditions) and professional (as a learning and development consultant, trainer, coach and mentor, I often work with people who have lost their confidence, have limiting beliefs about their potential and do not have any effective strategies to cope with stress and mental anguish).

 

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With this in mind, whilst being absorbed by the subject matter in and for itself, the main question I always had at the forefront of my thinking was: ‘‘How will this new knowledge be useful to me and how can I apply it?” It quickly became clear to me that the CBH concepts, skills and strategies would help me in relation to: (i) coping with my own challenges, insecurities, irrational demands and unhealthy emotions; (ii) understanding how to help and guide (though not treat) friends when they experience unhealthy, negative emotions; (iii) my role as a learning and development coach and consultant; (iv) my role as a potential CBH therapist.

The course has been fantastic in exceeding my hopes and expectations. On a personal level I have become closer to a family member now I understand her behaviour more and at work there have already been loads of benefits. Recently, for example, I undertook a training event with participants from all over England, called ‘Mindset and Mindfulness’. This was heavily influenced by what I’ve learned on the three CBH courses.

There is a quotation from Abraham Maslow that has always resonated with me; “To learn and not to do, is not to learn”. This has become my guiding principle in relation to CBH. Even though at the moment I am busy with my primary occupation as a learning and development consultant, I have decided to always be working with at least one therapeutic client at any given time, to cement my classroom learning with real therapeutic experience. My short term goal is to help people to cope more effectively with challenging events and psychological conditions. Going forward five years or more, I would love to have the breadth of experience and competence as a therapist to deliver courses of this nature and inspire other people, as I have been inspired by the whole experience at CCBT.

By Bob Craig

So, could you become a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist?

22 Feb

Well here at the College we train people from all sorts of backgrounds. These have included marketing executives, medical practitioners, nurses, PR consultants, hypnotherapists, psychotherapists, IT managers as well as housewives. Quite a list!

They all have one thing in common though, a desire to make a difference.

cbh conversation

However, as in all walks of life, different careers suit different people, so let’s do some investigation!

The first point to note is, to begin the training, you do not have to be an academic! There are no specific requirements for the Foundation course, such as a degree, as we believe that your experiences in life and other skills are just as valid.

Of course, initially you will not know what to expect and whether it would be a good step for you, so we invite you to an interview in an informal setting.
This interview is nothing to worry about as it is designed to give all concerned the opportunity to assess each other’s suitability. After all, there would be nothing to gain, if at a later date you found you had made the wrong decision and it was not for you!

So, sounds interesting and worth pursuing so far? Well, let’s move on to some practicalities to consider.

Although our courses are very flexible and held at the weekends, so you can fit them in around your present employment; it has to be said embarking on any change of career is a big step and can impact on those around you.
For example, they will miss your presence for several weekends and the training will require your dedication and full attention.
However, when family members see how you are progressing, no doubt you will have their full support.

There are also financial considerations as well. We aim to make these as helpful as possible and it is a good idea to discuss them at the initial interview. Our fees can be paid in installments or, if you are able to, if you pay in full you will receive a discount.

So could you become a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist? We think you could and would welcome the opportunity to welcome you to our College to begin your training.

January blues, not if we can help it!

21 Jan

Well, the festivities are over and many of us are back at work. The weather is chilly and there is a distinct lack of sunlight. Energy bills are looming and those New Year resolutions are proving very hard to keep. Oh dear, there is little doubt January can trigger the blues!

Let’s try to analyse how we can be feeling and how we can change our demeanour and state of mind.

• Maybe there was a little over indulgence and now we don’t like what the scales are telling us. This is not a major problem, if we address the problem straight away. Remember, the way we eat over the Christmas period is bound to pile on the pounds. However by maintaining a healthy lifestyle and combining a sensible diet with regular exercise, within weeks an ideal weight can be achieved. So, that is one problem that can be solved with a little effort and determination.

• Often there is a deflated feeling due to the tensions and stresses of being around relatives for a prolonged period of time. There may have been arguments and upsets between family members that still need resolving. These are better sorted out sooner rather than later and not allowed to fester. If possible, contact the people concerned and build bridges. Nobody is perfect and everyone makes mistakes. Make amends and move forward. Another issue that is within our capabilities to solve!

• An important trigger of January blues can be returning to work after a long break, to a job we are not happy in. Try to make some changes, so your present job will be more acceptable and fulfilling. If that is not possible, you may feel that the only way forward is a change of career. Our Master Class ‘Introduction to counselling skills’ can give you an insight in to one possible career move.

• Ok, we should be feeling a lot more positive now, but we still have to discuss the issue of over spending at Christmas. This is a tricky problem but one that should not be swept under the carpet. Depending on your financial situation, make a plan on how you can ease the burden of your debts and make sure you keep to it. You may need to alter the way you spend to make your plan work. Probably the most challenging problem to deal with but certainly if you deal with it, your mood will be lightened due to the constructive attitude and actions.

Well, there are lots of things to consider but we think January is starting to look a lot more enjoyable. We will finish with an interesting phenomenon – the lack of natural sunlight at this time of year, can lead to tiredness and feeling under the weather. While we cannot change the latitude of the county, there are things we can do to increase the amount of daily sunlight we receive. Try to get outdoors during the day, maybe at lunchtime, and go for a nice, long walk at the weekend. This is also an enjoyable way to help to get to grips with that weight gain topic we discussed earlier! The wonderful thing about our climate is its distinct phases and they should be embraced and enjoyed. The more time you can spend outside, the better!

We love January with its potential to set you up for a great rest of the year and hope you do too!