Tag Archives: CBT therapist

How to cope more effectively with work-related stress

16 Sep

Work-related stress is one of the biggest (and most modern) blights to our physical and emotional wellbeing. According to research last year from the Centre for Economics and Business Research (Cebr), staff sickness cost the UK over £6.5bn. The report also said that staff absenteeism cost the average company about £620,000 a year.

 

Meanwhile, The Labour Force Survey 2011/12 found that around 22.7 million working days were lost last year because of work-related illnesses, whilst another, more recent, study of over 3,000 people discovered that one in three said their stress was work-related.

 

That’s a lot of lost money, a lot of lost days and a lot of unhappy workers!

 

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Work stress can come in a variety of guises, be it long hours, a workload that’s far too heavy, deadlines that are way too intense, interpersonal difficulties (such as not getting on with your manager), performance expectations, boredom, the threat of redundancy, and more; the list goes on.

 

Stressed out employees are more likely too feel irritable, experience mood swings, feel unable to cope and generally lead less productive working lives than their more relaxed counterparts.

 

Work stress itself can lead to a multitude of disorders including anxiety, depression, anger management issues, panic attacks, insomnia, alcohol and drug problems, even tension headaches and migraines.

 

The Healthy and Safety Executive (HSE) define stress as, “The adverse reaction people have to excessive pressures or other types of demand placed on them at work,” while the British Standards Institution (BSI) says, “Stress manifests as a physical, psychological or social dysfunction resulting in individuals feeling unable to bridge the gap with the requirements or expectations placed upon them.”

 

Technically, stress is the manifestation of the flight-or-fight response, a much-needed safety mechanism that helps alert you to danger and take the appropriate action. However, it’s meant to be a one-off reaction to specific challenges and pressures. Once the danger is over, the body (and the person that inhabits it) can return to normal.

 

Sadly, modern life is a never-ending series of threats and pressures and so the chemicals associated with the fight-or-flight response are constantly dumping toxins in the body, creating physical and emotional ill health.

 

But, there are things you can do to help restore that balance and become a healthy and productive working member of society once more and no, we’re not talking about changing your job!

 

Sure, it’s an option but, it’s one that’s a little drastic for some and nigh on impossible for others. Also, it doesn’t change the nature of the beast. What if the new job is even more pressurised than the last?

 

Which is where cognitive behavioural hypnotherapy (CBH) comes in very handy indeed.

 

CBH follows the philosophy that it is not the events in life that disturb you, but the views that you take of those events that disturbs you. So, if you’re thinking, feeling and acting in a way that you don’t like, but don’t seem to be able to change, we don’t look at the ‘thing’ we look at what you are telling yourself about the ‘thing.’

 

Change what you tell yourself, and you can change how you think, feel and act.

 

Work, then, is the ‘thing’ CBH can help you change your perceptions of. A trained professional can help you cope with pressure more effectively, facilitate solutions to difficult workloads and deadlines, aid you in dealing with those irksome interpersonal difficulties in a better way, conquer your angers and anxieties and lead to an altogether healthier, happier and more productive you.

 

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CBH, in the form of therapy, is an excellent tool for helping you manage your work-related stress. However, when delivered in the form of workshops (and yes, we are talking to all you HR managers out there) it can be an excellent form of prevention.

 

Just think what it would mean for your company and your staff if you could head stress off at the pass?

Training to Be a Cognitive Behavioural Hypnotherapist – My experience

13 Aug

I have just completed my Advanced Diploma exam at CCBT. The journey to this point has taken just over a year to complete taking the fast track route Foundation, Diploma before the Advanced Diploma courses. In this time I have learned huge amounts about myself, my fellow students and people in general. I am now a practicing CBH therapist and believe the courses have equipped me for this demanding and rewarding role. All the staff at CCBT willingly share their wealth of experience (without breaking confidentiality of course), are skilled trainers and are all thoroughly good people. The course materials are packed with pragmatic, useful, and concise information and the course assessments are challenging and thoughtfully designed to embed the underlying principles, core structure and key concepts of CBT / REBT.

Becoming a therapist wasn’t the main motivation for me when signing up for the Foundation course. Initially, the main reasons were personal (I wanted to learn more about self hypnosis and to understand more about depression and anxiety as I have friends and family members with these conditions) and professional (as a learning and development consultant, trainer, coach and mentor, I often work with people who have lost their confidence, have limiting beliefs about their potential and do not have any effective strategies to cope with stress and mental anguish).

 

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With this in mind, whilst being absorbed by the subject matter in and for itself, the main question I always had at the forefront of my thinking was: ‘‘How will this new knowledge be useful to me and how can I apply it?” It quickly became clear to me that the CBH concepts, skills and strategies would help me in relation to: (i) coping with my own challenges, insecurities, irrational demands and unhealthy emotions; (ii) understanding how to help and guide (though not treat) friends when they experience unhealthy, negative emotions; (iii) my role as a learning and development coach and consultant; (iv) my role as a potential CBH therapist.

The course has been fantastic in exceeding my hopes and expectations. On a personal level I have become closer to a family member now I understand her behaviour more and at work there have already been loads of benefits. Recently, for example, I undertook a training event with participants from all over England, called ‘Mindset and Mindfulness’. This was heavily influenced by what I’ve learned on the three CBH courses.

There is a quotation from Abraham Maslow that has always resonated with me; “To learn and not to do, is not to learn”. This has become my guiding principle in relation to CBH. Even though at the moment I am busy with my primary occupation as a learning and development consultant, I have decided to always be working with at least one therapeutic client at any given time, to cement my classroom learning with real therapeutic experience. My short term goal is to help people to cope more effectively with challenging events and psychological conditions. Going forward five years or more, I would love to have the breadth of experience and competence as a therapist to deliver courses of this nature and inspire other people, as I have been inspired by the whole experience at CCBT.

By Bob Craig

So, could you become a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist?

22 Feb

Well here at the College we train people from all sorts of backgrounds. These have included marketing executives, medical practitioners, nurses, PR consultants, hypnotherapists, psychotherapists, IT managers as well as housewives. Quite a list!

They all have one thing in common though, a desire to make a difference.

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However, as in all walks of life, different careers suit different people, so let’s do some investigation!

The first point to note is, to begin the training, you do not have to be an academic! There are no specific requirements for the Foundation course, such as a degree, as we believe that your experiences in life and other skills are just as valid.

Of course, initially you will not know what to expect and whether it would be a good step for you, so we invite you to an interview in an informal setting.
This interview is nothing to worry about as it is designed to give all concerned the opportunity to assess each other’s suitability. After all, there would be nothing to gain, if at a later date you found you had made the wrong decision and it was not for you!

So, sounds interesting and worth pursuing so far? Well, let’s move on to some practicalities to consider.

Although our courses are very flexible and held at the weekends, so you can fit them in around your present employment; it has to be said embarking on any change of career is a big step and can impact on those around you.
For example, they will miss your presence for several weekends and the training will require your dedication and full attention.
However, when family members see how you are progressing, no doubt you will have their full support.

There are also financial considerations as well. We aim to make these as helpful as possible and it is a good idea to discuss them at the initial interview. Our fees can be paid in installments or, if you are able to, if you pay in full you will receive a discount.

So could you become a Cognitive Behavioural Therapist? We think you could and would welcome the opportunity to welcome you to our College to begin your training.

How are Cognitive Behavioural Therapies used in the National Health Service?

28 Jan

Before we start discussing this topic, it will be helpful to have a definition of Cognitive Behavioural Therapies (CBT), as defined by the NHS.

CBT is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. Talking and changing your behaviour can change how you think (cognitive) and what you do (behaviour). This can make you feel better about life.

CBT has been shown to be an effective way of treating a number of different health problems, such as depression, eating disorders, phobias, addictions, insomnia and anger management. In fact, the list seems endless!

CBT can also be effective for long term health problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and arthritis. Although CBT cannot cure the physical symptoms of these health conditions, it can help people cope better with their symptoms.
So how is the NHS using CBT in its treatments?

Well, the answer is in lots of ways, and as the Government aims to make counselling and other types of talking therapies, including CBT, more easily available on the NHS, this use will increase over the next few years.

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Indeed, the NHS has an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. IAPT aims to put thousands more trained therapists into GP surgeries. The scheme will provide easy access to talking treatments on the NHS to those who need it. Part of the programme includes a four year plan of action for Talking Therapies.

Overall, the number of sessions, a client will need depends on individual problems and objectives. Treatment usually lasts six weeks to six months.

At CCBT, we understand the importance of CBT for treating all sorts of conditions, and are pleased that the NHS is working to improve access to these therapies. If you are interested in training to become a CBT Therapist yourself, please visit our website.