Tag Archives: CBT in NHS

What are you afraid of?

22 Apr

Most of us a little bit scared about one thing or another: scared of things that, for fairly rational reasons, we just don’t like, or would prefer to avoid. But, for some people, it’s something way more than being scared, it’s something beyond their control and it’s called a phobia.

A phobia is an anxiety disorder that’s commonly referred to as a persistent fear of an object or situation, one that the sufferer will either go to great lengths to avoid, or endure with marked distress. It’s a fear they recognise as irrational and one that is typically disproportionate to the danger actually posed by the thing itself.

The word comes from the Greek, Phóbos – meaning ‘fear’ or ‘morbid fear’ – and is itself a derivative of Phebomai – meaning ‘to flee’ or ‘withdraw’ – hence the running away from the thing that scares you.

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In Greek mythology, Phobos was the god of fear and terror. It’s also the name of the largest of the two Mars moons.

In psychotherapy, there are three main types of phobia: social, specific and agoraphobia.

Social phobias are broken down into two types, generalised social phobia (or social anxiety) and specific social phobia (where the anxiety is triggered only in specific situations).

Specific phobias cover almost anything and everything else including fears of flying, animals, catching a specific illness, water, heights, clowns, buttons, injections, thunder, bridges and, even, work.

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Each specific phobia has its own name. The fear of clowns, for instance, is called Coulrophobia (and no, it’s not just restricted to evil clowns, but covers the nice ones too) while the fear of work is known as Ergophobia.

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There’s even a phobia that is culture specific, in that it’s almost exclusively experienced by Japanese people: Taijin Kyofusho, a fear of offending or harming other people.

Agoraphobia gets its only special category however, as it’s a much more complex affair (or multi-phobic, to be precise), and can include a generalised fear of leaving home or other safe places, coupled with a fear of having a panic attack, a fear of open spaces, of being socially embarrassed and more.

However, CBT is considered to be the gold standard treatment for anxiety disorders (including phobias) by the NHS.

Not only that, but lots of research highlights the efficacy of hypnotherapy in the treatment of the same.

Put the two together and not only are you are looking at a more effective treatment package, but also faster results too (studies have shown that the two therapies together can be more effective and more rapid than when either one is used alone).

CBT has a very definite viewpoint on emotional problems, including phobias, namely it’s not the thing that disturbs you, but what you tell yourself about the thing that provokes your disturbance.

Unhealthy beliefs about a situation or an object will lead to an unhealthy and phobic you, whilst a healthy set of beliefs (whilst not quite having you fearless in the face of your thing) will lead to what we call healthy concern – a much more manageable emotion in which you realise, whilst you may never be comfortable around it, you can most definitely handle the ‘thing.’  (You can learn about these different types of emotions and what provokes them from our previous blogs or you can also check Visual CBT on Amazon by Avy Joseph and Maggie Chapman.)

Hypnotherapy in the context of beliefs can help support the work that CBT is trying to do.

However, it can also be used to gradually desensitise you to various aspects of your phobia (for instance, someone with a wasp phobia might have a phobic reaction on seeing pictures of wasps or even the word itself) as you build up to confronting the main event.

It can also be used to change your self-belief, mood and get better (typically, phobia suffers can suffer from depression and self esteem problems as a consequence of the phobia).

By-the-by, whilst the Office of National Statistics claim that 1.9 per cent of the adult UK population are phobic at any one time, animal phobia is the number one phobia in women, followed by heights; whilst heights is the number one phobia for men, followed by animals.

Finally, there are four states that are incompatible with fear: hunger, thirst, relaxation (which is why hypnotherapy works so well) and sex.

So, if you’re hungry, thirsty, under hypnosis or just plain …erm … “excited”, your phobia is not going to get a look in.

How are Cognitive Behavioural Therapies used in the National Health Service?

28 Jan

Before we start discussing this topic, it will be helpful to have a definition of Cognitive Behavioural Therapies (CBT), as defined by the NHS.

CBT is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. Talking and changing your behaviour can change how you think (cognitive) and what you do (behaviour). This can make you feel better about life.

CBT has been shown to be an effective way of treating a number of different health problems, such as depression, eating disorders, phobias, addictions, insomnia and anger management. In fact, the list seems endless!

CBT can also be effective for long term health problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and arthritis. Although CBT cannot cure the physical symptoms of these health conditions, it can help people cope better with their symptoms.
So how is the NHS using CBT in its treatments?

Well, the answer is in lots of ways, and as the Government aims to make counselling and other types of talking therapies, including CBT, more easily available on the NHS, this use will increase over the next few years.

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Indeed, the NHS has an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. IAPT aims to put thousands more trained therapists into GP surgeries. The scheme will provide easy access to talking treatments on the NHS to those who need it. Part of the programme includes a four year plan of action for Talking Therapies.

Overall, the number of sessions, a client will need depends on individual problems and objectives. Treatment usually lasts six weeks to six months.

At CCBT, we understand the importance of CBT for treating all sorts of conditions, and are pleased that the NHS is working to improve access to these therapies. If you are interested in training to become a CBT Therapist yourself, please visit our website.