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Manage your expectations and stress levels during this Summer of Sport!

13 Jul

So, the 2012 Olympics are almost upon us! The event will be met with mixed emotions from many people as the ramifications impact on our everyday lives. To some, the initial reaction will be one of panic, as the worry of trying to get to work through the inevitable congestion hits home. Can I cope with the crowded trains, will I get to work late, and will I be able to get home to watch a particular event on TV? What about if a tube breaks down or my bus doesn’t even arrive or is packed? There seem to be 101 things to worry about.

Manage your travel during the Olympic games

Albert Ellis said we generally disturb ourselves about three major things

  • I must do well, greatly, perfectly, outstandingly and must win the approval of others or else it’s awful, I can’t stand it and I’m no good and I’ll never do anything well.  This can lead to anxiety, depression, despair and a sense of worthlessness, jealousy, hurt, unhealthy envy, guilt, shame and embarrassment and unhealthy anger with the self.
  • Other people must do the right thing or be a certain way or treat me well, or kindly or considerately and put me in the centre of their attention or else it’s horrible, unbearable and proves they are bad and no good.  This can lead to unhealthy anger, rage, hostility resentment, jealously, envy.

But the Olympics are likely to trigger this 3rd attitude in some people. 

  • Life must be easy, without discomfort or inconvenience or any hassle otherwise it’s horrible and unbearable.  This leads to low frustration tolerance and unhealthy anger.

 When we think about this third thing, we understand that it is not realistic, and the important thing is how we deal with more difficult situations.

In the case of transport hassles around London 2012, there are many ways we can cope with this and prepare ourselves. We do not want to feel frustrated and angry for the two weeks of the Olympics.  Basically, we need to manage our expectations and plan in advance:

  • Accept the hassle and inconvenience because we know it will happen. 
  • Remember, it’s only temporary and that it will come to an end. We can tolerate and stand the hassle. It does not kill us. It’s just a hassle.
  • Plan in advance and allow extra time so that you do not feel rushed all the time
  • Try to look at the positive side of the Olympics. After all, it is a major event for the country. A lot of people have worked very hard to make them a success and every effort has been made to minimise the impact on the transport system.
  • If you don’t support the Olympics in London and worry about the hassle, then focus on the fact that it will all come to an end and that you can stand the hassle of the games even  though you do not agree with them.

So, focus on the benefits of the Olympic Games, the enjoyment it will bring to millions of people, the efforts and successes of the athletes and the two weeks will pass all too quickly!