How are Cognitive Behavioural Therapies used in the National Health Service?

28 Jan

Before we start discussing this topic, it will be helpful to have a definition of Cognitive Behavioural Therapies (CBT), as defined by the NHS.

CBT is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. Talking and changing your behaviour can change how you think (cognitive) and what you do (behaviour). This can make you feel better about life.

CBT has been shown to be an effective way of treating a number of different health problems, such as depression, eating disorders, phobias, addictions, insomnia and anger management. In fact, the list seems endless!

CBT can also be effective for long term health problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and arthritis. Although CBT cannot cure the physical symptoms of these health conditions, it can help people cope better with their symptoms.
So how is the NHS using CBT in its treatments?

Well, the answer is in lots of ways, and as the Government aims to make counselling and other types of talking therapies, including CBT, more easily available on the NHS, this use will increase over the next few years.

cbh conversation

Indeed, the NHS has an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. IAPT aims to put thousands more trained therapists into GP surgeries. The scheme will provide easy access to talking treatments on the NHS to those who need it. Part of the programme includes a four year plan of action for Talking Therapies.

Overall, the number of sessions, a client will need depends on individual problems and objectives. Treatment usually lasts six weeks to six months.

At CCBT, we understand the importance of CBT for treating all sorts of conditions, and are pleased that the NHS is working to improve access to these therapies. If you are interested in training to become a CBT Therapist yourself, please visit our website.

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